Book Review – All Things Reconsidered

All Things Reconsidered
by Knox McCoy

Every artist, who has their first hit, is faced with a challenge.

How do you release a second offering?

It has to be similar enough to the first one to still sound like the hit that people have come to love, but not be so similar that people find it repetitive to the first presentation.

This happens all the time with music, but can also be true for books. This was a fear I faced when presented with the opportunity to read Knox’s second book.

Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this book from Nelson Books through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
#AllThingsReconsidered #NetGalley

All Things Reconsidered:
How Rethinking What We Know
Helps Us Know What We Believe
by Knox McCoy

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Book Description:

If we ask just one question, does everything fall apart? 

In All Things Reconsidered, popular podcaster Knox McCoy uses a unique blend of humor, pop culture references, and personal stories to show how a willingness to reconsider ideas can actually help us grow ourselves, our lives, and our beliefs. 


In this laugh-out-loud defense of reconsideration, Knox dives into topics like:
Are participation trophies truly the worst?
Is it really worth it to be a ride-or-die sports fan?
Do we believe in God because of the promise of heaven—or the threat of hell?
Does prayer work? Is anyone even there?


This book is the catalyst we need to courageously ask the questions that will lead to a deeper understanding of ourselves—and God. It’s time to start reconsidering.

My Take:

With the same fun-loving humor we know and love from Knox, along with the thoughtful and poignant storytelling we were introduced to in The Wondering Years, All Things Reconsidered balances on that line between comfort in what we know and newness that keeps us coming back for more.

Reading this book was like having a conversation with an old friend – you might have been there for some of the stories, but the retelling is still hilarious and learning something new from someone you’ve known is delightful.

Also, don’t miss the footnotes!

Favorite Lines

Reconsideration is the difference between a faith that is for display purposes only and one that can lead you out of captivity.
Reconsideration is the difference between a faith that is for display purposes only and one that can lead you out of captivity.
The world is wide enough for us to disagree with each other without resorting to petty dismissiveness.
The world is wide enough for us to disagree with each other without resorting to petty dismissiveness.
It’s no longer enough to just react to an issue or idea before moving on. It’s our obligation to dig a little deeper to more completely understand it.
It’s no longer enough to just react to an issue or idea before moving on. It’s our obligation to dig a little deeper to more completely understand it.

The Final Verdict

SK Book Rating Scale

My rating: 5 stars

Would I recommend? Yes

Extras

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Minority Opinion

In my family, there are three of us – MyChild, MyHusband, and myself.

Most of the time we come to a consensus, but, as there is an odd number, there are times when the third gives in to the opinion or wishes of the two. 

When this happens for dinner, the third is often placated by there being something they like, even if the location or menu wasn’t their first choice.

It’s when the third opinion is completely opposite the two that things get quiet.

Am I wrong?
Am I the only one that like that?
Am I the imagining how I feel about this?

Questioning you own feelings and emotions can be terrifying.

Is something wrong with me?

This is how it is when I want to write a negative review.

SO many questions of my own opinion.

But, everyone else LOVES this writer/movie/place. Why don’t I?

minority opinion definition

We watched Onward a few weeks ago. MyChild and MyHusband loved it. I thought it was very cute, but all I kept thinking was, “Okay, Disney. Got it. You made all this money on the Frozen franchise and the power of sisters, now we need the power of brothers.”
*insert eye roll*

Call me cynical or whatever – I just didn’t love this movie that soooo many people have raved about.

Was I just cranky? Just a bitch?

I come across this problem with book reviews, too.

In one book I recently read, I wanted to write a negative review. The basis for this was the author’s tendency to go on and on about a subject. Get to the fricken’ point! To say my time is valuable is one thing, but often the point is that my attention span is short. I know you have a word count to reach, but get on with it!

But, no, I didn’t publish the review in that manner.

For another example, while reading a different book, the author reminded me of people I’ve known throughout my life. You probably know them, too. The type who thinks they are hilarious, or this particular joke is hilarious, and tries WAY TOO HARD to make it land or to make you agree that they are funny.

source

I’m over here with the pained smile and mediocre chuckle – “yes, you are so funny. Ha. Ha.”

But, was it just me?

Was I in a bad mood when I was reading that? Was I projecting my own issues onto this poor book just fighting for a chance?

Don’t get me wrong, if I absolutely do not like a book, I’ll say as much, but I also try to understand how I am feeling when I want to react that way.

A current mantra has been:

If you hate the world, eat something. If you think the world hates you, take a nap.

The world needs all of our voices, but sometimes we should stop and think before publishing or stating a harsh review. We need to consider our own biases, our own background, our own moods.

I listened to a podcast recently and found one host condescending and a bit rude; the other felt the need to over-explain everything. This is a highly rated podcast, but it was clear the humor and content was not for me. There wasn’t a need for me to comment about this, I just turned it off and let it go.

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Let it go

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Parting thought on when to speak your mind:

If they can't fix it in 10 seconds, don't point it out.

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